MyBnk Home

Login LinkedIn Flickr YouTube Twitter Facebook
Young People Click Here

Comment – Payday ads

Financial literacy needs a lot of ingredients to work. What we do, financial education, is just one of those. Parenting, peer pressure and culture all play a role, media and advertising, a potent one.

We work hard to counter ill-informed attitudes and beliefs towards money, spending and debt. At the beginning of every workshop, pupils complete a form asking basic financial questions to gauge their ability. The results are mixed, they know the slogans and terminologies but many misinterpret their meanings – APR and AER being the most prevalent.

That is why we have campaigned for restrictions on payday lender adverts before the 9PM watershed and supported Paul Bloomfield MP’s High Cost Credit Bill.

Recently the Advertising Standards Authority ruled that a high profile payday ad “misled” viewers – implying that an interest rate over over 5000% was “irrelevant” when taking out a loan. Earlier in the year the government decided against a curb of advertising rules on the industry.

This stinks.

Payday ads already make a disturbing impression on young people in terms of brand awareness and desensitising debt, now we learn that that impression is also misleading.

It makes our job of arming youths with money skills even harder when 13-year-olds are listing payday as a source of income along with wages and investments.

Us adults are bamboozled by misleading offers and are used to being lied to, the government needs to look again at how financial services pitch and place their products and protect our young people from marketing which allows dangerous financial habits to form.

Parenting and peer pressure all play a part in developing our attitudes towards money, but continuing practices like these risks rendering the inclusion of financial education into the National Curriculum this September quite irrelevant.

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learn Money Week Days 6-8: Enterprise & BIG TIME money lessons

 

 

The final Days of Learn Money Week saw attention turn to the markets of London’s iconic Camden Town and MyBnk’s biggest ever one day money marathon at a single school.

On Day Six, MyBnk’s experts took enterprise education to the streets as teams from City & Islington College took their products to market in our Business Battle programme. they doubled their money making nearly a £100 from MyBnk interest free loans. As well as gaining valuable experience in their first enterprise outing, they learnt how to budget and cost out a project by doing it for real. Winning loan application teams from Bishop Chandler’s Catholic School also started their enterprise journey as we began turning their business ideas into a reality.

“I’m doing a business course BTEC and during the MyBnk session I’ve learnt about team work, it was a chance to try something new and be creative. We had a look at budgeting and our team took out a £44 loan. These skills are important for use in the future, I want to have my own business, either a salon or nursery. I’ll be going to college and university to achieve this. I’ve enjoyed the MyBnk session but I wish we had more than one day for the market stall so we could make even more profit!” Farzana, 15.

Our experts where also on hand to help 650 11-14 year olds at the Jewish Community Secondary School and Tower Hamlets Pupil Referral Unit understand the origins of capital and how it flows between institutions by discovering the history and features of money, forms of payment and currency & exchange rates. The Money Twist project also examines budgeting, youth employment, minimum wage, needs and wants, risk and saving.

“It’s important for young people to learn about this so they aren’t clueless when they’re older and won’t get into debt, this can help them avoid it.  I’ve learnt about the security features of bank notes today and I enjoyed the session, especially learning the history of money.” Noah, 13, Jewish Community School.

That is a wrap folks for Learn Money Week 2014, stay tuned for the winners of the A to Z of money competition and a worldwide roundup.

 

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Civil Servants Raise £100′s in financial education 24 hour spinathon!

 

A huge thanks to young civil servants who powered through a 24 hour spinathon to raise money for MyBnk!

Deep in the heart of Whitehall, members of the Fast Stream team sweated it out on several alternate four hour cycle tours. Not that they needed any extra pressure to cross the finish line, their bosses turned up! Vince Cable, Business Secretary and University Minister David Willetts popped in to give some encouragement and to find out about MyBnk’s financial education and enterprise programmes.

So far the 19 strong team has raised over £900 – meaning we can arm nearly 100 young people with key money management skills or give scores of youths their first enterprise experience in a live market loans challenge. There are lots more challenges to come, including scaling the Yorkshire Three Peaks and next month the team will be collecting donations at tube stations around London.

“We’re doing a spinathon because MyBnk is giving support and valuable teaching to young people which is important especially in today’s climate. It’s a fun way to raise money and a good challenge as well as getting the wider department involved as there’s a lot of people in this building that are interested in enterprise as well so it’s really good to showcase what MyBnk do.” Ruth, Department for Business Innovation and Skills.

Show your support and donate, now!

https://www.justgiving.com/MyBnkFund

Also, keep up to date on their latest escapades via their Twitter page.

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learn Money Week Day 5 – UK’s DfE backing, India, Portugal, Germany

 

Day 5 of Learn Money Week saw us gain the backing of Elizabeth Truss MP, the UK’s Education Secretary and new countries joining the financial education jamboree. It also saw enterprise come to to fore once again.

She praised the scheme as an “excellent opportunity to boost awareness of financial management among young people” and will “provide a major boost to the financial awareness of young people and will ensure they leave school with the budgeting, money management and financial skills needed to succeed.”

570 young people in India took part in activities at PSGR Krishnammal School in workshops linked to coins, currencies and transactions as well as submitting A to Z of Money Posters. Across in Lisbon, the Global Shapers Community celebrated a secondary school’s 50th birthday by helping 150 students with Learn Money resources.

In three schools in Dusseldorf, Germany, 150 students aged 8-10 discussed spending, investing and charity – the session was led by one of the original founders of Learn Money Week, Henrik Naujoks from Bain & Associates.

Back in the UK, our experts where also on hand to help 200 11-14 year olds at Crown Woods College understand the origins of capital and how it flows between institutions by discovering the history and features of money, forms of payment and currency & exchange rates. The Money Twist project also examines budgeting, youth employment, minimum wage, needs and wants, risk and saving.

Enterprise also played an important part in bringing money discipline to youths, with young people. Youths at City & Islington College ramped up their enterprise projects ahead of selling at Camden Market this Saturday. Young teens at Barnet & Southgate College have been wrestling with the pounds and pence as they reported on their Enterprise-in-a-Box project selling ethical products into the community – teams made nearly £200 profit in their first enterprise experience.

“It’s definitely important for young people to learn this for the future so they have more opportunities and experience in running their own businesses. I’ve learnt new skills such as how the money works and how to persuade people to buy your product, you need confidence, body language, eye contact and communication with your customers. We talked about budgeting to calculate the profit for our market, I’m ready! Lauren, 16, barnet & Islington College, Business Battle, MyBnk.

 

Young people living in sheltered accomidation at Peabody Housing Asociation addressed independent living in seven 45 minute 1-2-1 Money Advice Service sessions. Still in the UK, AXA Insurance continued their partnership with Redstart to give young people at Upton Park School lessons in budgeting, assets and wealth, liabilities, risk and Dragons Den style enterprise challenges.

In the USA and South Africa, Operation Hope delivered their Banking on our Future workshop, helping hundreds of youths in High Schools and youth groups take control of their money by learning about empowerment and responsibility.

The National Skills Academy brought Barclays Money Skills weeks to 23 schools and colleges across England to help youths manage their money, reduce financial stress and increase their chances of achieving their financial goals. They were also training staff from housing associations and credit unions in money management programmes through the Lloyds Money For Life programme.

Be Better and Citi Bank China helped youths tackle saving and consuming, continuing their events for youths between ages 10-17 years participating in exciting activities such as team survival games on financial topics, bank visits, workshops on money matters and social topics and more.

Day 6 brings financial education to the streets of Camden Town Market, London in an all out Business Battle for City & Islington College.

 

 

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Education Minister backs Learn Money Week!

 

Elizabeth Truss MP has given her backing to our Learn Money Week campaign and financial education as we zoom past the half way stage of an all-action expedition for financial literacy. 

As MyBnk reached thousands of young people across London, the North West and North East of England, partners in 15 other countries also armed tens of thousands of young people with key money skills like budgeting, borrowing and banking.

We also helped ring the opening bell at the London Stock Exchange, hosted an expert-led financial literacy panel debate and featured Guest Blogs from Syed Kamall MEP, Mumsnet, Broadstone and others.

There is still three and a bit days to go including live market enterprise challenges, a BBC Radio London special on Sunday 6PM GMT and our biggest ever one-day financial education project involving 650 pupils at the Jewish Community Secondary School.

Education Minister Elizabeth Truss said:

“Managing money and planning budgets are important life skills that help people make informed decisions. Learn Money Week is an excellent opportunity to boost awareness of financial management among young people.

“Financial education is so important, which is why, for the very first time, the rigorous new maths curriculum will ensure primary and secondary school pupils will be taught about personal finance, such as loan repayments and interest rates. Secondary school pupils will also learn financial literacy in citizenship lessons.

“This will provide a major boost to the financial awareness of young people and will ensure they leave school with the budgeting, money management and financial skills needed to succeed.”

Thanks! 

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learn Money Week Day 4 – London Stock Exchange, USA USA & enterprise

 

Things got loud on Day 4 of Learn Money Week as we helped unleash the London Stock Exchange and ring the opening bell this morning – reaching 8,000 young people on the penultimate day.

We were joined by teenage bankers from Westminster Academy and LSE CEO Alexander Justham who praised the “inspirational” LMW and Global Money Week initiatives, the Executive Director of the Money Advice Service Mark Fiander and the founder of Children and Youth Finance International, Jeroo Billimoria. The students run their own in-school, online, micro-finance scheme and have hundreds of fellow pupils saving real money every week.

Two of those banks also took center stage today as young bankers threw open the doors of Forest Gate Community School and St Martins-in-the-Field and got scores of fellow pupils to save up to £200 in just a single lunch-break.

In the USA and South Africa, Operation Hope delivered their Banking on our Future workshop, helping hundreds of youths in High Schools and youth groups in LA, Washington DC, Philadelphia, Colorado, Baltimore, California and Johannesburg take control of their money by learning about empowerment and responsibility.

“It was interesting finding out the actual numbers for things such as the tax brackets. I think it’s important for young people to learn this because it’s important to manage finance, it’s something always happening in the world. I’ve enjoyed this, it’s been engaging.” Vincent, 18, London Academy of Excellence.

Our experts where also on hand to help 700 11-14 year olds at Crown Woods College, London Academy of Excellence and Ashcroft College understand the origins of capital and how it flows between institutions by discovering the history and features of money, forms of payment and currency & exchange rates. The Money Twist project also examines budgeting, youth employment, minimum wage, needs and wants, risk and saving.

Enterprise also played an important part in bringing money discipline to youths, with young people assessing fellow pupils loan applications, paying close attention to how they costed out their business plans at Bishop Chandler Secondary School. Business Battlers at City & Islington College ramped up their enterprise projects ahead of selling at Camden Market this Saturday. Young teens at Elm Green School have been wrestling with the pounds and pence as they sell ethical products into their community via the social Enterprise-in-a-Box project.

2,500 youths took on budgeting, saving and investments at Shahjalal University and Jalalabab College with Bangladesh’s Sabirul Islam, Founder of Inspire1Million organisation. Save the Children’s YouthSave project continued to help 3,600 youths via banking workshops, essay competitions on saving and policy roundtables with government ministers and young people in Ghana, Columbia and Kenya.

The National Skills Academy brought Barclays Money Skills weeks to 23 schools and colleges across England to help youths manage their money, reduce financial stress and increase their chances of achieving their financial goals. They were also training staff from housing associations and credit unions in money management programmes through the Lloyds Money For Life programme.

Youths at Hertfordishire Youth Services and Dropzone had the chance to detoxify their relationship with money in Money Works sessions with MyBnk and the Cumbria Youth Alliance. Young tenants at Gateway Housing addressed arrears and prioritised bills in seven 45 minute 1-2-1 Money Advice Service sessions. Still in the UK, AXA Insurance continued their partnership with Redstart to give young people at Upton Park School lessons in budgeting, assets and wealth, liabilities, risk and Dragons Den style enterprise challenges.

Be Better and Citi Bank China helped youths tackle saving and consuming, continuing their events for youths between ages 10-17 years participating in exciting activities such as team survival games on financial topics, bank visits, workshops on money matters and social topics and more.

Tomorrow, Portugal and Portland!

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learn Money Week Guest Blog – Pensions

 

On each day of our Learn Money Week financial education campaign, we will be featuring a guest blog from key stakeholders, i.e. the people who collectively help achieve financial literacy.

Today we present the thoughts of David Brooks from Broadstone on the financial product young people really need to know about – it is the pension perspective.

Pensions are boring

Pensions suffer from a few key perceptions that can be problematic but can be solved through education.

They constitute some of the major financial decisions of your life. The decisions individuals make through their working lifetime will directly determine the timing and quality of their retirement years.

Pensions are often complicated

Pensions are complicated (sometimes unnecessarily so) and come into contact with an individual’s ability to make a number of decisions around:

  • budgeting (how much to save)
  • planning (when to save)
  • strategy and risk assessment (investment choices)

Pensions are boring

I am amazed but when I mention I work in pensions at parties (yes we pensions people do go out sometimes) people glaze over. The main reason that pensions are boring is that procrastination power is very strong and other more immediate calls on an individual’s’ income will always seem to be more attractive, and in some cases they’ll be right, but it is clear that the earlier you start the better the outcome will be.

Pensions will affect nearly everyone

All of us will have some aspiration to stop work at some point and while many think their house is their pension (it isn’t, it’s your home!) having a pension fund is the most efficient method to plan for that eventuality. To have a pension you need to defer your income now (in the most simplest sense that’s what a pension is, deferred income).

There are lots of different types of pensions and employers are now obliged to get involved and provide them for most of their workforce via the Government’s auto-enrolment legislation. So a pension should be an everyday occurrence for almost all of us. Understanding what is happening and why will make sure that people make the informed and correct decision.

Financial Education is the answer 

To my mind the answer to all of these problems is clear, and that is through education.

People should be given the skills to evaluate the importance of planning their financial future by appreciating some of the benefits of pensions (tax breaks, the employer contribution and compound interest). This begins with the skills to budget, plan and assess strategy all the things that MyBnk do for their young people.

Ok, I concede that pensions will still be boring but if young people are given the ability to understand the importance of starting early, deferring some of their income for their future, together with taking some extra money from their employer and the tax man, then we will have people that will be able to enjoy their retirement years. As a pensions consultant that it is at the heart of what I do and I see the work that MyBnk do as key to achieving that.

David Brooks.

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learn Money Week Day 3 – University, youth-led banks & training

 

Day three of Learn Money Week saw over 20 sessions by nine financial education outfits reach 6,500 young people worldwide.

In the UK, MyBnk brought fully functional banks to Westminster Academy and Mount Carmel Girls School. A dozen young teens and their teachers have been trained to operate an online and in-school banking system, MyBnk-in-a-Box. At lunchtime the two threw their doors open and scores of young people deposited real money to get into good financial habits…and save up for the weekend!

In an intense session at St Pauls Way Trust School we were literally playing with young people’s future in a specialist university financial education workshop, Uni Dosh. As well as debunking student debt we explored Sixth Formers options with bursaries and planned how they were going to sustain independent living. All 24 were leaving home for the first time! The group couldn’t believe how much water bills costed and did not like the idea of using loan sharks and payday loans, one said if you did use one you’d end up having to pay back with your house.

“I’m not good at saving but I’m going to open a bank account now because I always spend my money that I have on hand which isn’t good. I’ll be studying international relations in university and I’m looking forward to it. It’s important to learn this because this will be the first time we’ll have to do it alone and I’ve enjoyed it, it’s been fun and interesting.” Rahi, 18:

Our experts where also on hand to help 700 11-14 year olds at Ashcroft Academy, Woodside High and Mount Carmel understand the origins of capital and how it flows between institutions by discovering the history and features of money, forms of payment and currency & exchange rates. The Money Twist project also examines budgeting, youth employment, minimum wage, needs and wants, risk and saving.

We used the Business Battle drawing board to market enterprise challenge to apply practical learning to financial education.experts where also on hand at City & Islington College. Youths at Lambeth College had the chance to detoxify their relationship with money in Money Works sessions. Young tenants at Vision Housing addressed arrears and prioritised bills in seven 45 minute 1-2-1 Money Advice Service sessions.

Still in the UK, AXA Insurance continued their partnership with Redstart to give young people at Upton Park School lessons in budgeting, assets and wealth, liabilities, risk and Dragons Den style enterprise challenges. The National Skills Academy brought Barclays Money Skills weeks to 23 schools and colleges across England to help youths manage their money, reduce financial stress and increase their chances of achieving their financial goals. They were also training staff from housing associations and credit unions in money management programmes through the Lloyds Money For Life programme. Oxford Economics were at Eynsham Primary School, delivering the specialist Learn Money Week Piggy bank resource to get young people into saving.

In China! Be Better and Citi Bank China are organising events for youths between ages 10-17 years participating in exciting activities such as team survival games on financial topics, bank visits, workshops on money matters and social topics and more.

1,000 youths learned how to make the most of a limited income at Tulip International School, Dinajpur, with Bangladesh’s Sabirul Islam, Founder of Inspire1Million organisation. Save the Children’s YouthSave project continued to help 3,600 youths via banking workshops, essay competitions on saving and policy roundtables with government ministers and young people in Ghana, Columbia and Kenya.

Other innovative projects like the USA’s Operation Hope and their Banking on our Future workshop, helped 230 youths including vulnerable young people at Denver Probation services, Reginald F. Lewis High School and Empowering Young Minds of Baltimore and Lotus River High in Cape Town, South Africa, take control of their money by learning about empowerment and responsibility.

Tomorrow we bring financial education to the floor of the London Stock Exchange and help ring the opening bell!

 

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learn Money Week Guest Blog: Parenting

 

On each day of our Learn Money Week financial education campaign, we will be featuring a guest blog from key stakeholders, i.e. the people who collectively help achieve financial literacy.

Today we present the thoughts of Sarah Crown, Editor of parenting website Mumsnet.

There’s no doubt that parents are feeling under real financial pressure these days: when you’re raising a family at the same time as contending with stagnant wages, rising living costs and some of the highest childcare fees in Europe, success can often mean simply staying afloat. In such a testing climate, parents are more aware than ever of how crucial it is to pass on healthy financial attitudes to their children – but for many, there are a raft of questions that need to be answered before they can begin.

How do we teach our children that money doesn’t just magically appear? What’s the best way to encourage them to see the rewards of saving and spending responsibly? And when do they really need to learn about banks, loans, credit cards and interest rates?

Actions speak as loud than words

It’s no easy task, especially given that half of what children learn about money will take place through observation rather than direct instruction. When it comes to cash, our actions speak just as loudly as words; if we ourselves are constantly overspending or obsessively saving, it’s highly likely that our children will model the same behaviour when they grow up.

Understandably, many parents don’t want to ‘let on’ to their children that the family’s basic lifestyle – let alone treats and plans for the future – is afforded through stress or sacrifice. But avoiding the subject can be counter-productive. Just as it’s unwise to bury your head in the sand when the bills arrive, so it’s better to educate your children from the get-go. From as soon as they’re old enough to understand, it’s worth explaining that money isn’t magic stuff that just ‘lands’ in bank accounts, and that credit cards aren’t a way of getting what you want, when you want it, with no repercussions. Our children need to be taught how to save – and equally, how to spend.

Saying no whilst under siege

It’s hard work, and our users are quick to realise where their efforts are being undermined – whether through marketers selling ‘must-have’ toys at hyper-inflated prices, or, as we are increasingly seeing on Mumsnet, online games companies pushing in-app purchases at young players. In addition to developing an eagle eye for small print, Mumsnetters describe having to become experts in the art of saying ‘no’ where needed, and finding age-appropriate ways of educating or reprimanding as their children learn that careless spending has its consequences.

Without doubt, one of the most popular methods of encouraging money consciousness in children is through pocket money. Every family is different, but at whichever age you decide to introduce this as a tool for children’s learning, you’re introducing that same notion of spending control: if children earn or save their money, it’s theirs to spend on whatever they choose.

Getting the buzz

It’s important to be clear on what pocket money covers, and not to give in if they spend without thinking and come asking for more, so that they learn that once it’s gone, it’s gone. In the long run, they’ll be developing the skills to make decisions and prioritise, and they’ll get a buzz from being able to buy for themselves the reward they really want. We know from our users that this lesson is often applied across the board, so that if children receive money for Christmas or birthdays, they’re encouraged to put some to one side and make a proper decision on how it should be spent.

The next step – opening a bank account for you children – can feel like a serious one, but when the reach the age of seven or eight, it can help them get used to the idea of banks as a place to save. While every bank has an option for children, what’s clear is the need for responsible measures to offer added protection. Accounts for children should not allow direct debits or standing orders, and need systems in place that flag irregularities up, preventing children from becoming overdrawn or incurring charges.

Where a system has these checks and balances in place, we’ve found that a growing number of Mumsnetters allow their children to have debit cards. Many parents feel that it teaches children how to budget and engenders responsibility about money, as well as being a good opportunity to touch upon subjects such as interest. If children can comprehend that the money you keep in the bank is actually lent to the bank – and, in return, the bank pays you to borrow it – they’re likely to be more ‘switched on’ to some of the jargon and small print as teens and young adults.

Sarah Crown, Mumsnet.

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Learn Money Week Day 2 – Launch Event, S. Africa, Vulnerable Young People & 1-2-1 Advice

 

We reached 5,500 young people worldwide today with direct, fun, relavent and engaging financial education projects!

Monday night saw the official launch of Learn Money Week in London with games and debates that brought money lessons to life as 100 people from charities, trusts, foundations and the world of finance gathered. The crowd made their own Learn Money Promises including Lord Hutton’s vow to ‘talk to his children about saving up for retirement’ and cutting back on spending. We were also treated to money emotion in the forms of raps and poems by MyBnk’s education officers – videos coming soon!

Central to the night was bringing together providers, funders, supporters and young people. An expert panel including teenage banker Benedict Mavila, discussed Financial Literacy: How do we bring it all together?

Young people from St Martins-in-the-Field High School for Girls touched on engagement. “Make education sexy!” was financial journalist, Iona Bain’s response – MyBnk CEO Lily Lapenna explained how we co-create programmes via our Youth Advisory Panel. Other issues addressed media, peer pressure, role models and parenting, all of which help form young people’s money habits and attitudes. Jackie Oatway, Head of Policy at the Money Advice Service, helped give the audience an overview of the wider UK financial education strategy. Robert Gardner CEO of Redington Pensions spoke about his CSR model that brings financial education and young people into the office through their RedStart project.

There was also a chance to get a sneaky peek at some of the knockout entries in the A to Z of Money Competition! Check the base of this piece.

“I spend all of my money but since having the MyBnk workshop, I’ve decided I’m always going to leave £1 of my money at home as savings. I’ve learnt a lot of new skills today such as how to make money and how to spot fake notes. I think teaching this to young people is important because young people are often targeted and I’ve enjoyed the session, it’s been fun.” Lathujan, 12, Preston Manor high School. 

Back on the frontlines, 1,000 youths took on saving and self investment in Scholastica School, Dhaka, with Bangladesh’s Sabirul Islam, Founder of Inspire1Million organisation. Save the Children’s YouthSave project continued to help 3,600 youths via banking workshops, essay competitions on saving and policy roundtables with government ministers and young people in Ghana, Columbia and Kenya.

Other innovative projects like the USA’s Operation Hope and their Banking on our Future workshop, helped vulnerable young people at a residential child care unit in Denver, 125 youths in Baltimore’s Poly Institute and Factreton Primary School in Cape Town, South Africa take control of their money by learning about empowerment and responsibility.

MyBnk were also helping vulnerable youths understand the origins of capital and how it flows between institutions by discovering the history and features of money, forms of payment and currency & exchange rates at Redbridge Looked After Children Unit.  240 pupils at Preston Manor High, Wembley went further with the Money Twist project and examined budgeting, youth employment, minimum wage, needs and wants, risk and saving. Our experts where also on hand at City & Islington College using a Business Battle drawing board to market enterprise challenge to apply practical learning to financial education. Youths at the 198 Gallery and crime prevention charity Nacro had the chance to detoxify their relationship with money in Money Works sessions. Young people at Hornsey YMCA addressed arrears and prioritised bills in seven 45 minute 1-2-1 Money Advice Service sessions. Still in the UK, AXA Insurance continued their partnership with Redstart to give young people at Upton Park School lessons in budgeting, assets and wealth, liabilities, risk and Dragons Den style enterprise challenges.

More tomorrow!

 

 

Posted on by MyBnk in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
← Older posts